How to Make Kombucha At Home

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Ever wonder how to make Kombucha at home? We’re here to help!

It’s likely very tempting to rush out to the store to buy a bottle of kombucha right now. But you can make it at home! It’s simple and affordable. So save your hard-earned cash for a gourmet vegan pizza instead. Read on to learn about how to brew your own fizzy beverage.

Kombucha is an ancient beverage that’s more of a science experiment than you might realize. Originating in East Asia, kombucha is a refreshing, fizzy, fermented tea that boasts numerous health benefits ranging from detoxification of the digestive tract to strengthening of the immune system. It also contains B vitamins, antioxidants, amino acids, and probiotics. Impressive!

Why is science involved? In order for kombucha to ferment properly, a SCOBY is essential to the process. Huh? What’s a SCOBY? A SCOBY is a “symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast” that will reproduce with each batch of kombucha brewed. It can be ugly, stringy, slimy, clumpy… but it’s the magic that makes kombucha what it is.

I live in a city with several small kombucha breweries, including Oregon Kombucha. So, it seemed rather fitting to do a review of their Kombucha Starter Kit. I’ve got to represent the Pacific Northwest! If you’re intimidated by brewing your own kombucha, don’t be—it’s fun.

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Photo by Amy Gedgaudas

Each Oregon Kombucha kit contains a live kombucha culture packet (remember the SCOBY?) and an organic tea bag. It makes an entire gallon, so if you have friends, sip and share! The process is simple. Here it is all summed up in video form:

1. Boil a gallon of water in a large pot and add the tea bag.

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Photo by Amy Gedgaudas

2. Steep for recommended amount of time and remove tea bag.

3. Add sugar and stir to dissolve.

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Photo by Amy Gedgaudas

4. Pour contents into a gallon-sized container and allow to cool.

5. Once cool, add the SCOBY and cover the container with a clean cloth and secure with a rubber band.

6. Wait patiently until your batch tastes how you want it to, anywhere from 7-28+ days.

7. Bottle and store your kombucha in the refrigerator.

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Photo by Amy Gedgaudas

You can even use the SCOBY for future batches of kombucha! That’s recycling at its finest. My batch grew a massive disk of SCOBY that actually startled me. But the end result was a bubbly, slightly sweet, and tart beverage. I already have plans to brew additional batches in different flavor combinations. Give it a go and see what you think!

7 Comments

  1. Jennifer C

    How do you get the tea out without disturbing the scoby? Can you just scoop it out to reuse again?

  2. Kandi Jo

    After you cover the container with a cloth, where is it supposed to be stored while waiting the 7-28 days? In the fridge, on the counter, outside? =oP just want to clarify.

    • Amy

      Hi Kandi!
      I stored my jar on the kitchen counter. I’d suggest any indoor space away from direct sunlight. Too cool a temperature will slow down the process significantly. Too warm a temperature can cause the brew to ferment too quickly not leaving enough time for the new SCOBY to develop. It is also important not to move or otherwise disturb the jar during the process.

  3. Bee

    Hey! Want to try this! Do I have to use sugar? I don’t like sweet drinks!

  4. Gina

    “this video does not exsist” :-(

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